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Expert Panel Session on Wind Markets & Supply and Value Chain:

 

 

List of the three panelists:

 

1. Stephen Rach, Supply Chain Manager, Canadian Wind Energy Association, on "Wind Market in Canada: Trends in Supply & Demand"

 

2. George Mandrapilias, Team Leader Office of Green and Materials Industries, Ministry of Economic Development and Trade, on "Ontario’s Experience From An Economic Development Perspective"

 

3. David Johnson, Professor, University of Waterloo, on "Research and Development in Support of the Wind Industry"

 

It is planned that each panelist will make 15 minutes presentation (for a total of one hour) followed by 30 minutes questions and answers and discussion. Also the panel info is being featured online at the conference website.

 

 

Stephen Rach

Supply Chain Manager

Canadian Wind Energy Association

Tel: 613.234.8716 x 243

Cel: 613.219.7165
www.canwea.ca
 

 

 

Biography: Stephen is focused on helping businesses navigate their way through the Canadian wind energy market. Whether it be in the boardrooms of Canada's largest manufacturers to the shop floor of start-up companies, Stephen strives to provide vision, insight and strategic thinking to every company he works with. His diverse expertise in business development, marketing, intelligence, analysis, engineering and project management helps companies to accelerate the performance of their business. Prior to his position at CanWEA, Stephen worked for several year with Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters in supply chain development initiatives in the oil and gas, nuclear, and green energy sectors and held account management, sales and program management positions at Flextronics, Veolia Environmental and Magna International. Stephen has an undergraduate degree in Chemical Engineering and Management Sciences from the University of Waterloo, and is currently studying marketing at the University of Toronto. In his spare time, Stephen reads far too much non-fiction literature, plays competitive amateur tennis and is an avid cyclist.

 

Abstract: CanWEA will provide an overview the wind market opportunity in Canada and identify areas in both the supply and value chains that offer the greatest opportunity now and in the near future.

 

 

George Mandrapilias

Team Leader Office of Green and Materials Industries

Ministry of Economic Development and Trade

Hearst Block 7th Floor

900 Bay Street

Toronto ON M7A 2E1

george.mandrapilias@ontario.ca

phone: 416-325-6768; cell: 416-525-3593; fax:416-325-6885

 

 

 

Biography: George Mandrapilias was born in a small village outside Sparta, Greece and immigrated to Canada with his family. George attended the University of Toronto where he did his undergraduate and graduate studies (PhD in physical organic chemistry). George joined Shell Canada Chemicals Company at the Oakville Research Centre as a senior research chemist. George held a number of positions at Shell in Market Research, Business Development, Strategic Planning and New Development/Specialties Chemicals. George joined the Ontario Government as the sector specialist in chemicals, plastics and advanced materials. George has worked closely with industry to develop policies and strategies in the areas of clean technologies, investment, retention, technology, chemicals, plastics and trade. Currently, George leads the Materials Industries Team at Ontario’s Ministry of Economic Development and Trade which aims to build and strengthen the competitiveness of Ontario's materials and clean technologies industries. George is married and has three daughters. He enjoys jogging, bridge and camping.

 

Abstract: Ontario’s Green Energy Act, Feed in Tariffs and development of the wind supply chains will be discussed. The economic impact on Ontario’s clean technologies industries, especially wind, will be outlined.

 

 

David Johnson

Wind Energy Group

Department of Mechanical Engineering

University of Waterloo

200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1

da3johns@mecheng1.uwaterloo.ca

www.windenergy.uwaterloo.ca

phone: (519) 888-4567 x33690 fax: (519) 885-5862 

 

photo

 

 

Biography: Professor David Johnson is an associate professor in the Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering at the University of Waterloo and has significant expertise in the wind energy industry. He presently heads the Wind Energy Laboratory in the Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering at the University of Waterloo. Prior to joining the University of Waterloo he worked within Ontario Hydro and also was the General Manager of a local distribution electrical utility in Ontario. He has strong industrial connections and experience working in a large multi-national company in Denmark. He is a part of the cross-Canada NSERC Wind Energy Strategic Network (WESNet) and is developing a research partnership between all the major commercial wind farm operators in Ontario and the university. Within the Waterloo group, a large number of researchers are engaged in projects of direct interest to the wind energy industry. The Group is involved in a wide variety of wind energy projects from wind energy resource assessment and instrumentation, wind turbine blade aerodynamic design and manufacturing including blade surface materials, wind turbine aeroacoustic instrumentation and noise studies, and full scale testing of turbines.

 

Abstract: Wind energy implementation is growing at a significant rate worldwide and also within Canada where resource and economic conditions are favourable. Many regions of Canada have unique geographic and climatic conditions that present challenges for the wind energy industry. These challenges may be addressed through a strong research and development effort that supports the industry and at the same time develops highly qualified and trained technical personnel. Some examples will be used to illustrate these ideas.